Sinclair | Madison County, MO: John Sinclair – The Mob

I’m in the process of making the connection to this particular person as the last name in Madison County, Missouri fits in with my Sinclair/St. Clair line from Madison County, MO.

My Great(x5) Grandfather, William Ashley Sinclair/St. Clair (written both ways on census records; 1860 & 1870 Madison County, MO), was born in 1827 and lived in Madison County, Missouri. William Ashley Sinclair/St. Clair was the father of Rebecca Sinclair who married Henry F Frizzell.

John Sinclair could be William’s father. Other family historians have stated that he is. I have yet to confirm this connection:


First Source: 
ID: I50083

Name: John St Clair
Given Name: John
Surname: St Clair
Sex: M
Birth: 1753 in North Carolina
Death: Abt 1823 in Madison Co., MO
_UID: EA5546E8610B4997AE3BBCF5158247CF00DA
Change Date: 10 Jan 2009

Father: Charles Sinclair b: 1725
Mother: Nancy Ann Salling b: Abt 1758 in Scotland Or Orange Co, NC

Source: http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gfcob&id=I50083


Second Source: 
I’m new to this list and looking for help on my Sinclair/St. Clair family. I have the line quite a way back, but am not sure how much is correct. A good place to start is with John Sinclair married to Elizabeth Matthews. They had 4 children in Madison County, MO. Three of the children stayed in MO and kept the spelling Sinclair. One son moved to Texas and took the spelling St. Clair.

The children were:
Daniel Boone Sinclair (m. Melvina Graham)
William Ashley St. Clair (m. Wiley Ellen Johnson)
Margaret Rebecca Sinclair (m. Anthony Henderson Sharp)
Charles L. Sinclair

In Missouri, this family is connected to surnames Graham, Henderson, Sharp, Pruett and Matthews, among others. If this family hits home with anyone, I’d love to compare notes.

Thanks,
Karin Brown (Source)


 

In the meantime I wanted to document these newspaper articles as a reference/resource and also post it for those who may be researching this line in Madison County, Missouri.

Mob Law in Missouri

On the 5th inst. A mob at Fredericktown, Madison County, Missouri broke open the jail with axes, crowbars, & etc., took out a man  named Abraham Smith, under sentence of death for murder, and hung him to a tree near the jail.

The coroner’s jury found a true bill  against the murders, and several of them have been arrested and committed for trial.  Several have also made their escape.   We hope they will receive the punishment their guilt deserves.

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer – August 22, 1844 | http://genealogytrails.com/mo/madison/moblaw.htm


Lynch Law  

We learn, says the St. Louis Evening Gazette, that in Fredericktown, Madison County, Missouri, on the evening of the election, a mob broke into the jail of that place, and forcibly seized upon the person of the convicted murderer, name A. W. Smith, took him to a walnut tree and hung him upon the spot.

 Three of the parties concerned in the jail breaking were arrested and held on bail in the sum of $500.

 None of those implicated in the hanging had been arrested.

 Source: Sun – August 23, 1844 | http://genealogytrails.com/mo/madison/moblaw.htm


More Mob Law   

A man named Abraham Smith was taken from jail by force, and executed by a lawless gang in Fredericktown, Missouri, on the 5th inst.

Smith had been convicted of murder, and sentenced lo be executed on the lat day of June. The sentence had been stayed until the 1st September.  An attempt was made to execute him by mob violence on the 1st of June, which was resisted by the assembled people.

On the day of the late election, a company of half intoxicated men succeeded in breaking open the jail with axes, crow-bars, etc. and hung the prisoner.

The following we copy from the St. Louis Republican.

One of the gang got down the cell where Smith was in irons, & tied a rope around his neck.  Those above hauled Smith up by the rope, dragged him down stairs, and about fifty yards from the jail, and notwithstanding he was apparently dead when they reached the tree, hung  him up, where he remained some minutes.  They then let him down , when one of the gang, suspecting life was not sufficiently extinct persisted that they should again hang him up, which was done accordingly.

Robert M. Friercoroner, issued process immediately for a jury and on Monday night held an inquest on the body of Smith, when the jury returned a verdict that Smith came to this death by the hand of Jones, Sinclair, Mayse, Pollis, Cox, Blackburn, Shetley and five others, the names of whom we have not learned.

On Thursday a states warrant was issued for the arrest pf the offenders, and on Wednesday the sheriff succeeded in arresting Cox. Shetley, Blackburn, Pollis and another man who were undergoing an examination before the Justices.

Sinclair and Mayse, two of the ringleaders had not been found, when this news left Fredericktown.

On Saturday, we understand, Mayse was at St. Mary’s Landing, waiting for the first opportunity afforded, to escape justice, and no doubt succeeded.

The parties arrested were committed to take their trial for murder.

Source: Easton Gazette – September 7, 1844 | http://genealogytrails.com/mo/madison/moblaw.htm


A Brace Of Murders Caged   

Smith, who shot Drown, the engineer of the  steamboat Chicago, a short time since, at Peoria, Illinois, is now confined in the jail at Princeton.  His trial will take place next week before the Circuit Court of Peoria County, for murder in the first degree.

John Sinclair, who was committed to jail in St. Louis upon a charge of being one of the ringleaders of the mob that hung Abraham Smith, in Madison County, Missouri, on the 5th of August has been taken back for trial.

Source: Sun – October 15, 1844 | http://genealogytrails.com/mo/madison/newsand%20tidbits.htm


The Murder in Madison County   

Our readers will recollect the notice of the summary execution of a man named Abraham W. Smith by a mob, at Frederictown, in Madison County, Missouri, on the 6th day of August; that the ringleaders in this outrage escaped and were still at large.

Of the number was a man name John Sinclair, who was accidentally seen and recognized on the streets of St Louis lately.

A warrant was immediately procured for his arrest, and Justice Butler, on an examination of the case committed him to jail, where he will remain until he is removed to Madison County.

Sinclair as said to have been the principal in the affair — to have tied the rope around the man’s neck, and to have help to swing him up.

Eight or ten of the mob are now in jail, and if justice is done them, they will share the fate of the criminal whom they executed.

Source: New York Herald – October 16, 1844 | http://genealogytrails.com/mo/madison/murders.htm#TheMurderinMadisonCounty 

 

 

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Skiles | Dent County, MO: The Mysterious Stone-Walled Burial Plot

When my husband, daughter & I traveled to Lenox, Dent County, Missouri during the Summer of 2013 we knew our intentions of locating the infamous Mount Hermon Cemetery. I call it infamous because most of those buried there are connected via various family lineages of mine and I had been wanting to visit it since I was 19 years old (I was 39 when we made the trip). Twenty years later…we arrive.

It was in the middle of no where. Fortunately our GPS guided us there because I’m very confident that without it we would have been completely lost.

I knew the history of Mount Hermon and the records confirming that many of my ancestors were buried there. What I didn’t know was…

943626_10151795552933055_422311305_nA portion of the land (the east 2 acres) that this cemetery sits on was dedicated by my 4th Great Grandparents (Hezekiah Isreal Skiles & Mary “Polly” Hobson) as stated on a plaque to the left just past the main entrance.

The more I walked through the cemetery the more I had to take deep breaths — I’d say it’s safe to say that 90% of the people buried there are ancestors and via various lines. Somehow they all connect and generation after generation stayed in Dent County, Missouri for years. Nickles, Nichols (all the same line), Motsinger, Skiles…the list goes on & on.

I had to keep taking deep breaths because I never realized the magnitude of it until I walked through the gates and past the aforementioned plaque. The history of our ancestors almost felt as if it were calling out to me in the realm of, “I’m over here!”, “Look over here…”

Name after name after name were calling out to me from various spots in the cemetery. I felt like I hit the genealogical jackpot. I stood at the final resting places of ancestors I had been researching for years, some I had only know about for a while and some that were completely new to me. My camera would be my official documentation on this trip…there was no way I could write it all down.

There was one burial plot that captured my attention specifically –  the double plot surrounded by an enclosed stone wall. I knew, due to the location of the plot, that whomever was buried there was related (family plot), but I didn’t know who…or how. The stone was completely illegible and covered with vines, mold & moss. There was a newer headstone (laying flat on the ground to the right of the illegible stone headstone) that read, “Skiles”. I just didn’t know what Skiles or if there was one, two or more buried there. However, the size of the enclosement suggests no more than two plots.

45380_10151795558863055_372606175_n600586_10151795559008055_952736755_n 970122_10151795558933055_907393328_n

To admit that I was intrigued would be an understatement. Just less than a year later I would finally figure out who was buried there per this will transcription:

SKILES,  WILLIAM – will  dated 28 Feb 1877. 
Wife, Rachel Skiles, all estate and after her death to be equally divided among my heirs (not named).   After we are both decd, the exr is to place stones on our graves and enclose them by a good stone wall.   Exrx, wife Rachel.   Wit: M. M. McSpadden, J. D. Reddick & Silas Headrick.    Recorded 15 Feb 1878.  (page 86)
Source: http://genealogytrails.com/mo/dent/wills.htm
DENT COUNTY, MISSOURI 
WILL BOOK “A”,    1866 – 1893 

Just as soon as I read it I knew exactly what cemetery and plot that it was referring to. Is it officially confirmed? No, I would need to confirm that William & Rachel Skiles were buried at Mount Hermon. However, my hunch along with family history & the location of the Skiles family during this time period tells me that I’m right on the money.

I am going to try and make it back out there this summer to get a better picture of the headstone that lies flat to see what else the transcription says — just for better documentation. Until then… I’m satisfied with the connection.

Do I know who William & Rachel are in my lineage? No, but I have an idea of who they are. Without further research I won’t make that claim, publicly… as of yet. If you know, please fill me in. If I figure it out before then I’ll be sure to make an update.

 

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Frizzell | Madison Co, MO: State of Missouri vs Jason Frizzell 1847

The following court records are from Madison County, Missouri filed in 1847 and filed as State of Missouri vs Jason Frizzell. Because of the date I’m going to assume this is Jason Frizzell born in 1815 (Thomas Frizzell’s son). The other names listed were Needham Frizzell, John Smith, Jr and David Johnson. I’ll transcribe what Page 2 reads below:

Jason Frizzell - Madison County, MO - 1847 - page 1Jason Frizzell - Madison County, MO - 1847 - page 2Jason Frizzell - Madison County, MO - 1847 - page 3

Page 2 Transcription:

State of Missouri
County of Madison

Be it remembered that on the 11th day of August Eighteen hundred and forty-seven, Jason Frizzel of the County of Madison and state aforesaid, Needham Frizzel and John Smith junior of said county and state, as securities came before me one of the Justices of the Peace in and for said County of Madison & State aforesaid and acknowledged themselves to owe to the State of Missouri the sum of five hundred dollars lawful money of the United States to be respectively (illegible) of their respective goods and chattels, lands and tenements of the said Jason Frizzel first above mentioned fail in performing the conditions written.

The condition of this recognizance is such that if the above bound Jason Frizzel shall personally appear at the next Circuit Court to be holden in & for said County of Madison aforesaid to do and receive what shall then and there be enforced by the said Court and in the mean time shall keep the peace and be of good behavior towards the Common wealth or State and all it’s citizens and especially towards Davis Johnson of St. Francis township in said County. Then this recognizance to be void otherwise to remain in full force and effect.

(illegible) & inscribed to before me this 11th day of August 1847
David M Fox  for Justice of the Peace

Signed by
Jason Frizzell (his X mark)
Needham Frizzel  (his X mark)
John Smith, Jr (his X mark)

 

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Frizzell | Madison Co, MO: Will of Thomas Frizzell, Sr.

You can download a copy by clicking here.

In the name of God, Amen, I Thomas Frizell, of the County of Madison and State of  Missouri , being mindful of my mortality, do this 10th day of June, in the year our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty nine, make and publish this my last will and testament in the manner and form following:
First it is my will that my funeral expenses and all my just debts be fully paid, also that my wife Mary Ann Frizell have one third part of my estate according to the laws of the land to be given to her out of those things belonging to the estate which may be the more adaptive to her wants if it can be so done without interfering with the provisions for others hereinafter expressed. Also to my son Salathel Frizell, I give and bequeath the plantation on which I at this time reside, with all the tenements and fixtures thereunto attached in fee simple, situated in (and being in said County o f Madison and State of  Missouri , it being the north half of the northwest quarter of section 9 of Township no. 33 north of range no. six east containing eighty acres purchased by me of the U.S.A. at the land office at Jackson, as can be seen by reference as to certificate no. 6482 bearing date December 3, 1838. Also to my son Salathal Frizell, I give and bequeath the sum of two hundred dollars in cash to be paid to the said Salathal with whatever interest may have accrued thereon, when the said Salathal shall have arrived at the age of 21 years which money I desire to be placed in good hands with unequivocal security at an honest rate of interest by my Executor as soon after my decease as may be practicable provided if should God terminate my natural life before the said Salathel arrives at the said age of 21 years, otherwise to be paid to the said Salathel as soon after my decease as can be done without sacrifice. It is also my will that the residue of my property be sold and the proceeds thereof (except seven dollars to be appropriated) as shall be hereinafter expressed to be delivered as follows: To my son Needham Frizell 1/3 part, also to my son Salathel 1/3 part and also to my son in law Uriah Johnson and _ara his wife 1/3 part of said proceeds. To my son in law Thomas Nana More and Maria /Marisa, his wife, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar, also my son inlaw John Clubb and Marella, his wife I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar to be paid by my executor to the son in law at the first convenient season. To my son in-law Benjamin Cato and Louise his wife, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar. Also to my Jason Frizell I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar. Also to my son Thomas Frizell, Jr., I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar. Also to my daughter Jemima Frizell, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar to be paid to the last five named parties in person only. Upon their application when my executor is ready to make his final settlement and deliver his testamentary document to the proper authorities and which said five dollars my Executor shall deliver in his own hands until such personal application be made and lastly I hereby consider and appoint my friend__ to be the Executor of this my last will and testament and satisfying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 10th day of June, 1839

(seal) Thomas Frizell

Signed published and declared by the above named Thomas Frizell as and for his last will and testament in presence of us, who at his request have signed as witnesses to the same.

Fred T Overfield
Jerimiah Spencer
Napolean B. Allen
State of  Missouri  )
)
Madison County )

Be it remembered that on this 8th day of February in year of our Lord Eighteen Hundred and Forty-five, personally appeared in open court before Mr. Edward Evans, clerk of the county court of Madison County, Frederick Overfield and Napolean B. Allen, who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that they are being witnesses to the foregoing will and testament of Thomas Frizell, deceased, that the said testimony was of sound and disposing mind at the time of the execution thereof, and the said affiants and who signed their names as witnesses to the foregoing will and testament in the presence and at the request of the testator and in the presence of each other.

In testimony whereof I have hereinto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said court at office of Frederick Town this 8th day of February A.D. (1845)

8 Feb. 1845 Edward Evans, Clerk

Filed and recorded Feb. 26th A.D. 1845 Edward Evans, Clerk

26       Codicil

Last Will and Testament of Thomas Frizell, deceased
3 Sept. 1842

In the name of God, Amen, I Thomas Frizell of the County of Madison and State of  Missouri , being mindful of my mortality do this 3rd day of Sept. in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and forty two, make and publish this my last will and testament in the manner and form following: First it is my will that my personal expenses and all my just debts be fully paid, also that my wife Mary Ann Frizell have one third part of my estate according to the law of the land to be given to her out of those things belonging to my estate which may be more applicable to her wants, if it can be done without interfering with the provisions for others hereinafter exspressed. Also to my son Salathel Frizell, I give and bequeath the plantation on which I at this time reside with all the tenements and and fixtures thereinto attached; in fee simple, situate, lying and being in said half of the northwest quarter of section no. 9 of Township no. 33 north of Range no. 6 east, containing 80 acres purchased by me of the United States at the land office at Jackson as can be seen by reference to certificate no. 6482 bearing dte Dec. 3, 1838. Also to my son Salathel Frizell, I give and bequeath the sum of one hundred dollars in cash to be paid to the said Salathel with whatever interest may have accrued thereon when the said Salathel shall have arrived at the age of 21 years, which money I desire to be placed in good hands with unequivocal security at an honest rate of interest and by my Executor, as soon after my decease as may be practicable, provided it shall please God to terminate my natural life before the said Salathel arrives at the said age of 21 years, otherwise to be paid to the said Salathel as soon after my decease as can be done without sacrifice. It is also my will that the remainder of my propery tis to be sold, and the proceeds thereof (except nine dollars to be applied as shall hereinafter be expressed) to be equally divided between my son Salathel Frizell, John J Frizell, and Jefferson Frizell, and any and every other son or daughter which may be born unto me hereafter. To my son Needham Frizell I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar, also to my son in-law Uriah Johnson and Clara his wife I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar. Also to my son in-law, Thomas Nana Moore and Marina ? his wife, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar also to my son in-law John Clubb and Marella his wife, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar, to be paid to the said parties by my executor at the first convenient season. To my son in-law Benjamin Cato and Loues his wife, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar; Also to my son Jason Frizell I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar; Also to my son Thomas Frizell, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar; Also to my daughter Jemmima Frizell, I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar; Also to my daughter Nancy Frizell I will and bequeath the sum of one dollar to be paid to the last five named parties in person only upon their application, when my executor is ready to make his final settlement, and deliver his testamentary documents to the proper authorities and which said five dollars my executor shall reserve in his own hands until such personal application be made. And lastly I hereby constitute and appoint my friend __to be the executor of this my last will and testament and satisfying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

Thomas Frizell

Teste
Fred T. Overfield
A.J. Lacy
Samuel Brittan
I.E. Post

State of  Missouri  )
)
Madison County )

So be it remembered that on this 1st day of May in the year of our Lord, Eighteen Hundred and Forty Eight personally appeared in open court before Mr. Edward Evans, clerk of the County Court of Madison County, clerk of the County, Court of Madison County, Frederick T. Overfield and Samuel Brittan who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that they are subscribing witnesses to the foregoing last will and testament of Thomas Frizell, deceased. That the said testator was of sound and disposing mind at the time of the Execution thereof and that they the said affiants subscribed their names thereto as subscribing witnesses in the presence and at the request of the said Testator and in the presence of each other.

In Testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said court at office in Frederick Town this 1st day of May A.D. 1848

Edward Evans, clerk

Filed and recorded May 2nd A.D. 1848

Test Edward Evans, clerk

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Frizzell | Madison Co, MO: State of Missouri vs John Floyd (regarding assault with intent to kill Salathiel Frizzell)

Before you continue reading and looking at the court documents from Madison County, Missouri regarding the case of the State of Missouri vs John Floyd (regarding the assault with intent to kill Salathiel Frizzell) I feel it’s important to mention that I don’t know which Salathiel Frizzell that this is connected to.

Henry Frizzell’s brother, Salathiel, was living in Madison County, Missouri in 1860 (per the census records), but he was only 16 years old at the time. It does not state that the Salathiel they’re referring to was a minor at the time of the crime. So this could be referring to Henry’s Uncle Salathiel (Jason’s Brother) who was born about 1829 — that would make him approximately 31 years of age at the date of this crime — and he was living in Madison County, Missouri in 1860 as well.

Because of this I believe this court case is about the eldest Salathiel Frizzell and NOT Henry Frizzell’s brother.

Nothing in the documents mentions any other family members names as a resource. In fact, most of the witnesses subpoenaed were for the defendant (John Floyd) as it will show in the case documents attached below.

I will submit for the case of the State of Missouri vs Salathiel Frizzell (regarding assault with intent to kill John Floyd) in the next few weeks. I’ll document them in a new post once I receive them (they’ll only allow you to make one request at a time and it takes time to receive them so please bear with me).

Photographs of case documents are posted below. Please click on the image to view it in a larger size. Once it has loaded you can click it again to view it in an even larger size. I posted them in poster size for easier viewing.

Copyright Disclaimer: While I don’t mind sharing these photos/research for others to use, please do not save them and upload them to any other website unless it is documented that we know for certain which Salathiel that this case applies to.  Otherwise they are free to use. My copyright is embedded in the photo files via my camera for this specific reason. I just don’t like to see over-zealous family researchers adding unproven documentation to an ancestor as it can literally alter history, as I’m sure you’ll understand. 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Proof of Documentation

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The Results Are In – Ancestry DNA

Interesting how this all played right into what research I’ve been doing for the last 21 (almost 22) years. I didn’t know what to expect, but I can tell you that I am completely thrilled with the results. The test that I took was autosomal

What is an autosomal test?

  • Both males and females carry autosomal DNA, which is inherited from both your parents.
  • Autosomal DNA is found on a non-sex chromosome.  Humans have 22 pairs of autosomal chromosomes and a pair of sex chromosomes (X and Y).
  • Linked blocks of DNA across the 22 autosomal chromosomes are matched between two people.  The degree of matching yields evidence for the relationship.
  • If two people share identical segments of DNA, they may share a recent ancestor.
  • The Family Finder test adds to the information provided by Y-chromosome DNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) tests. It allows you to trace your other lineages such as your father’s mother’s father and your mother’s father’s mother.
  • The Family Finder program determines relationships for up to five generations, but is not as useful in tracing a single surname line.
  • To find the genealogical connection with your match, you need to consult traditional genealogy records. These are birth, marriage, and death records. They also include documents like the census.

To learn more about Ancestry.com DNA testing, please refer to their FAQ section here:
http://dna.ancestry.com/atFAQ

And now the results:

my ancestry dna

50% Great Britain (natives are at 60% so this is strong)
Primarily located in: England, Scotland, Wales
Also found in: Ireland, France, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria, Italy




27% Europe West (natives are at 48%)
Primarily located in: Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein
Also found in: England, Denmark, Italy, Slovenia, Czech Republic

 


 

8% Irish (I’m barely Irish lol — natives are at a whopping 95%)
Primarily located in: Ireland, Wales, Scotland
Also found in: France, England

 


 

6% Scandinavia (natives are at 84%)
Primarily located in: Sweden, Norway, Denmark
Also found in: Great Britain, France, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, the Baltic States, Finland

 


 

They also found trace amounts of:
Italy/Greece (5%; natives are at 72%)
Iberian Peninsula (2%; natives are at 54%)
East Europe (less than 1%; natives are at 83%)
AND West Asia (less than 1%; natives are at 82%)

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Ancestry DNA — Off on a New Journey

This is not a solicited post, this is the real deal.

I finally made the decision to order my Ancestry DNA Plus kit. I’ve been wanting to do this since the first time I heard about it, but the cost usually deterred me — or the fact that I’ve done rather well researching my family tree.

After receiving a code to purchase one for $89.00 and finding a code for free shipping, I jumped, and ordered it today.

I’ve been researching my family tree since I was 19 – I’m now 40 years old. However, there is always the lingering curiosity that looms in the back of every genealogist/family historian’s mind — who am I? Where did my family come from? What haven’t I discovered yet?

They said the kit should arrive in 14 business days and then once I mail it back it will take 6-8 weeks to receive the results. I’m already anticipating the results and I haven’t even technically began yet.

So stay tuned, I’ll be taking you all along for the journey and giving you the first insight as to how it all plays out.

To learn more about how it works view their FAQ page here: http://dna.ancestry.com/atFAQ

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James Nickels

James Nickels, Sr. is not my direct line – he is my 6th great grand uncle and brother to my 6th Great Grandfather Jonathan Nichols/Nickles.

I want to mention that all information is provided and researched by Brian Keith Nichols,
Matthias Nickles, Sr (and Elizabeth Allen) Gx4 Grandson, and author of Journey Along the Holston: A History of the Nickels Family. I am posting it so that others researching this family line will have further information to better help them discover their roots. All links, from this page, will take you to another descendant’s (of James Nickels) website where you can learn more about the people listed below. To view the story of James Nickels, Sr., written by Brian himself, please visit his website at this location.

Please take note that I’ve been told that James NickELs is the one who changed the spelling of the Nichols, Nickles, etc. line to Nickels. Note that his brother, Jonathan, changed it to NickLEs. Between those two brothers, alone, this is why we find so many variations of the last name and lineage.

Interesting note: Nickelsville, Virginia received its name as a result of the mercantile store started by William Nickles and Walter Nickels. The store was supported by Allen Nickels who transported goods to the store, and by Mathias Nickels who worked in the store. Walter Nickels was also the postmaster at Nickelsville, Virginia.

Please be sure to read Brian’s post about “The Last Hanging in Scott County, Virginia” as it will certainly intrigue you. You can find that post here.

James Nickels, Sr.:
Born about 1781 in Virginia.
Died August 1869 near Big Moccasin Creek in Scott County, Virginia.
Notes: James was a pump-maker and was instrumental in the development of the water system for Gate City, Virginia. In August of 1821, James was qualified for Justice of the Peace. In September of 1830, James was qualified for Commissioner of Revenue for the south district of Scott County, Virginia.

On January 13, 1803 James’ first marriage was to Jane Matney in Washington County, Virginia.
Jane was born about 1785 in Tazewell County, Virginia.
Jane died before 1855 in Pattonsville, Scott County, Virginia.

On April 10, 1839 Jane filed for divorce in Scott County and the divorce was granted.
According to the court documents, she and James had been separated since October 11, 1837. The divorce was granted and Jane subsequently lived with her oldest child, William Henderson Nickels. She never remarried.

Prior to the divorce James and Jane had 9 children as follows:

  1. William Henderson Nickels, Sr.:
    Born December 18, 1804 in Washington County, Virginia.
    Died November 9, 1865 in Pattonsville, Scott County, Virginia.
    William operated a general mercantile in Nickelsville, Virginia and later in Pattonsville.
    On February 4, 1830 William married his first wife Rebecca Evans in Scott County, Virginia.
    On May 7, 1855 William married his second wife Charlotte Lyons Lovel in Scott County, Virginia.

    William Henderson Nickels, Jr.

    William Henderson Nickels, Jr.

    Note: William Henderson Nickels, Jr., son of William Henderson, Sr. and Rebecca (Evans) Nickels, was born March 27, 1832 in Nickelsville, Scott Co., VA. He died March 15, 1916 in Duffield, Scott Co., VA. William was a merchant before and after the war. William enlisted as a Confederate soldier with Co. C of the 64th VA Mounted Infantry on February 19, 1863 in Washington Co., VA. He was promoted to Commissary Sergent before August 31, 1863.

    William married first Elizabeth Duff. He married second Sarah Lawson. William and Elizabeth had seven children: Samuel Tipton Nickels, William Barlow Nickels, Martha “Mattie” Nickels, Nancy Elizabeth “Nannie” Nickels Parrish, Margaret Louise Nickels Horsley, Alice Nickels, and Patrick Nickels. William and Sarah had one child: John Thomas Nickels.

  2. James Nickels, Jr.:
    Born September 15, 1807 in Russell County, Virginia.
    Died December 19, 1895 near Nickelsville, Virginia.
    James’ primary occupation was farmer.
    On January 7, 1828 James married Frances “Fannie” Godsey in Scott County, Virginia.
    Note: James Godsey “Red Jim” Nickels, son of James, Jr. and Fannie (Godsey) Nickels, was born February 1828 in Nickelsville, Scott Co., VA. He died in 1928 in Grundy, Buchanan Co., VA. Jim was a Justice of the Peace for Buchanan Co., VA. He served with the 34th Battalion VA Cavalry during the Civil War.

    Stephen J. Nickles

    Stephen J. Nickels

    Note 2: Stephen J. Nickels, son of James, Jr. and Fannie (Godsey) Nickels, was born October 14, 1839 in Nickelsville, Scott Co., VA. He died December 27, 1912 in Wood near Dungannon, Scott Co., VA. He served with the 37th VA Infantry during the Civil War.

    Stephen married Lucy Ann Gray in July 1867. Stephen and Lucy had seven children: Flora Elizabeth Nickels Hobbs, Joseph T. Nickels, Laura Emogene Nickels Ramey, William Harvey Nickels, Lulia Nickels, Belle Nickels, and Earl Bays Nickels.

 

 

3. Cinderella “Cindy” Nickels:
Born about 1809 in Russell County, Virginia.
Died in 1877 in Wise County, Virginia.
on September 2, 1830 Cinderella married James Hiram Kilgore in Scott County, Virginia.

4. Walter H. Nickels:
Born September 27, 1811 in Russell County, Virginia.
Died September 10, 1867 near Bristol, Virginia/Tennessee.
Walter was postmaster at Nickelsville, Virginia.
Walter was a partner in the mercantile business with his brother, William.

On January 23, 1836 Walter married Jane Kilgore in Scott County, Virginia.

Note: William Washington “Barlow” Nickels, son of Walter H. and Jane (Kilgore) Nickels, was born January 28, 1838 in Nickelsville, Scott Co., VA. He died September 12, 1909 in Gate City, Scott Co., VA. He was a merchant by trade. He served with the 25th VA Infantry during the Civil War.

Barlow married Sarah Elizabeth Richmond on October 23, 1860 in Scott Co., VA. Barlow and Sarah had four children: Robert Henderson Nickels, Patrick Henry Nickels, George Emmett Nickels, and Isaac Benton Nickels.

Note 2: Isaac Alderson Nickels, son of Walter H. and Jane (Kilgore) Nickels was born about 1836 in Nickelsville, Scott Co., VA. He died in 1893 in Bristol, Sullivan Co., TN. He served with the 37th VA Infantry during the Civil War. Isaac purchased the Exchange Hotel in Bristol, TN on February 12, 1864 for $20,000 in Confederate notes. He later renamed it the Nickels House.

Isaac married Elizabeth E. Wood on February 21, 1865. Isaac and Elizabeth had two children: Blanche Nickels Fauqua and Myrtle Nickels Gordon.

5. Allen Nickels:
Born about 1812 in Russell County, Virginia.
Died June 11, 1879 on his homeplace near his father’s property in Scott County, Virgina.
Allen was a farmer and wagonmaster by trade.
Allen transported goods for his brothers’ stores in both Nickelsville and Pattonsville.

On June 2, 1832 Allen married Lucinda Salyer in Scott County, Virginia.

 

Henry Kane Nickels

Henry Kane Nickels

Note: Henry Kane Nickels, son of Allen and Lucinda (Salyer) Nickels, was born February 17, 1839 in Scott Co., VA. He died October 11, 1911 at his home in Long Hollow near Nickelsville in Scott Co., VA. Kane made shoes for a living. He enlisted as a Confederate soldier in Co. A of the 22nd VA Cavalry on August 4, 1863 in Scott Co., VA. His post-war pension application indicates that he served until the end of the war.

From Scott Co., Minute Book 28, Page 400: “IN Vacation of the County Court of the County of Scott on the 23rd day of July 1900. The Application of H.R. Nickels for a Pension with the certificate of the chairman of the Confederate Pension Board of the County of Scott, that it has been approved by said Board thereon endorsed; was presented to the Judge of this Court in Vacation; and the Clerk of this Court is directed to certify a copy of this order to the Auditor of Public accounts.”

It should be noted that Henry Kane Nickels was often erroneously listed as “H.R. Nickels” as the “K” was mistaken for an “R” due to the handwriting style.

Kane purchased 22 1/2 acres of land from his former commander, H.F. Kendrick, on November 15, 1888. This land was located in Long Hollow.

Kane married first Elizabeth A. “Betty” Marshall on November 21, 1861 in Scott Co., VA. He married second Sarah Ann Marshall on September 1, 1867 in Scott Co., VA. Sarah was the daughter of Elias and Elizabeth (Clark) Marshall. Kane and Sarah had seven children: William Henry “Billy” Nickels, Mary Ellen Nickels, Emily Frances Nickels Gibson, Alfred Martin Nickels, Newell Elias Nickels, Robert Allen Nickels, and Charles Franklin Nickels, Brian Nichol’s grandfather.

Peter Nickels

Peter Nickels

Note 2: Peter Nickels, son of Allen and Lucinda (Salyer) Nickels, was born March 17, 1832 in Scott Co., VA. He died July 3, 1929 near Snowflake in Scott Co., VA. Peter enlisted as a Confederate soldier in Co. A of the 22nd VA Cavalry on August 4, 1861 in Scott Co., VA. He was wounded while a courier in Monroe Co., WV. He was given a disability discharge at Saltville on May 18, 1863.

Peter married first Hannah Dean on December 17, 1857 in Scott Co., VA. He married second Maria Cosby (Addington) Quillen on April 18, 1888 in Scott Co., VA. Peter and Hannah had five children: John Henry Nickels, David Marion “T” Nickels, Charles Franklin Nickels, Mary Louise “Dovie” Nickels, and Walter Barlow “Dock” Nickels.

6. Elizabeth Nickels:
Born about 1816 in Scott County, Virginia.
Died before 1880 in Wise County, Virginia.
On January 11, 1837 Elizabeth married Samuel Courtney in Scott County, Virginia.

7. Brooks Nickels:
Born February 7, 1817 in Scott County, Virginia.
Died July 28, 1872 at his home near Big Moccasin Creek in Scott County, Virginia.
Brooks was a blacksmith by trade.
Tradition states that he drew up plans and helped build New Hope Church.

On December 8, 1837 Brooks married his first wife Elizabeth Kilgore in Scott County, Virginia.

On July 24, 1866 Brooks married his second wife Sarah Ann Gardner in Scott County, Virginia

8. Mary “Polly” Nickels:
Born July 1, 1819 in Scott County, Virginia.
Died May 10, 1899 in Wise County, Virginia.

On December 4, 1837 Mary married James Peter Kilgore in Scott County, Virginia

9. Mathias Nickels:
Born December 1, 1820 in Scott County, Virginia.
Died June 17, 1902 near Coeburn in Wise County, Virginia.
He worked for his brother, William, at both the Nickelsville and Pattonsville stores.

On August 6, 1846 Mathias married Louisa D. Harmon in Scott County, Virginia.

Mathias and Louisa had two children: William W. Nickels and James E. Nickels
Note: He served with the 88th Battalion VA Militia during the Civil War.

On June 12, 1855 James’ second marriage was to Serena Jaynes in Scott County, Virginia.
Serena was born about 1812.
Serena died September 11, 1888 in Scott County, Virginia.

James and Serena had 9 children as follows:

  1. James Jaynes-Nickels:
    Born about 1838 in Scott County, Virginia.
    He was living in the household with Serena Jaynes in 1850.
    He is not listed on the 1860 census of Scott County, Virginia with the rest of his family.
    He is not mentioned in James Nickels, Sr.’s will.
  2. Mary Ann Nickels:
    Born March 1840 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died after 1920.
    On June 2, 1858 Mary married Pleasant J. Steffey in Scott County, Virginia.
  3. Lucinda C. Nickels:
    Born December 5, 1846 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died December 15, 1889 in Scott County, Virginia.
    On August 22, 1864 Lucinda married John W. Renfro in Scott County, Virginia.
  4. Hannah Elizabeth Nickels:
    Born October 1847 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died in 1929 in Pike County, Kentucky.
    on May 2, 1866 Hannah married John Wesley Steffey in Scott County, Virginia.
  5. George Washington Nickles, Sr

    George Washington Nickels, Sr

    George Washington Nickels, Sr.:
    Born February 1850 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died after 1920 near Dungannon in Scott County, Virginia.
    George served in Company C, 64th Virginia Mounted Infantry during the Civil War.
    On May 12, 1869 George married hs first wife Delilah Stapleton in Scott County, Virginia.
    In 1905 George married his second wife Canzadia “Ada” Swain.
    In 1919 George married his third wife Mary Hammonds.
    Note: George enlisted as a Confederate soldier with Co. C in the 64th VA Mounted Infantry in 1861. He served four years and is included on the 1920 Scott Co., VA pension list. George and Lila had four children: D.F.L. “Lewis” Nickels, Elizabeth Nickels Smith, James Nickels, and Virginia Nickels Steffey. George and Ada had six children: George Washington Nickels, Jr., Ella Nickels Nelms, Serena “Reney” Nickels Gibson, Elsie Nickels Gibson, Oscar Nickels, and Dolly Nickels.

     

  6. Matilda Jane Nickels:
    Born March 1852 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died in 1909 in Nickelsville, Scott County, Virginia.
    On October 28, 1875 Matilda married James Dean in Scott County, Virginia.
  7. Dulaney J. Nickels:
    Born about 1853 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died after 1896.
    On May 11, 1869 Dulaney married Eli S. Salyer in Scott County, Virginia.
    They divorced on October 10, 1871.
    They re-married on October 18, 1887 and divorced again in 1896.
  8. Boenerges “Doc” Nickels:
    Born January 1854 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died December 22, 1913 in Pike County, Kentucky.
    In 1878 Boenerges married Mary Ellen Moore.
  9. Martha Nickels:
    Born about 1855 in Scott County, Virginia.
    Died before 1910.
    On January 14, 1892 Martha married Patton Ramey in Scott County, Virginia.
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SGT Amanda Pinson

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SGT Amanda Pinson is my 1st cousin; our Mothers are sisters. I wanted to create a memorial page for her on my family history website so important dates are listed & kept updated.

527088_10151099683549410_1958231426_nBorn: 07.31.1984 in St. Louis, MO
Died: 03.16.2006 in Tikrit, Iraq

Army Sgt. Amanda Pinson, 21, of Lemay, MO assigned to the 101st Military Intelligence Detachment, 501st Special Troops Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; was killed March 16th, 2006 when a mortar round detonated in Tikrit, Iraq. Pinson was a 98C Signals Intelligence Analyst and the first female Signal Intelligence Analyst to ever be killed in combat. The United States Army will be naming their new Cryptology Center, “Pinson Hall”, in her honor.

Pinson graduated from Hancock Place High School in 2002. She was one of the top students in the class, winning several scholarships. She cheered with the pompon squad, played basketball and softball.

At her funeral service, at Hoffmeister Funeral Home on Lemay Ferry Rd., her parents  accepted a Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Global War on Terrorism Medal and a Purple Heart for their daughter. Visitors filled the chapel and two other rooms to standing-room-only capacity, with closed-circuit television broadcasting the service.

State Rep. Patricia Yaeger, D-Lemay, told Pinson’s family at the service: “The state of Missouri stands with you. We mourn with you.”. During the procession, which included 117 bikers from the Patriot Guard, hundreds of Lemay residents lined the streets from the funeral home to Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery where Sgt. Pinson was laid to rest with full military honors.

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

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Plaque inside the building at entrance

Honored by the United States Army on July 26th, 2012:
The SGT Amanda N. Pinson Training Support Center ribbon cutting & plaque unveiling ceremony took place at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. The building sits on over 2 acres and took approximately 18 months to build. The building consists of four separate sections: Administrative, training (to include simulators like the Engagement Skills Simulator for weapons training), warehouse (where they have an equipment library to loan out training devices and items for units to use in their daily training activities), and a fabrication section (where they will be able to make training devices).

 

 

 

December 7, 2011: The plaque from Pinson Hall, on FOB Speicher in Tikrit, Iraq, was hand delivered to Amanda’s mother, by Sgt. Maj. Mari Sidwell 4th Infantry Division Military Intelligence Sergeant Major. It was removed from FOB Speicher as Speicher was shut down due to the withdrawal of US Troops from Iraq.

3829_10151630533669410_1487929339_nOctober 2011: Heroes Way sign placed at Bayless and Highway 55 (both North & South). Amanda grew up in Lemay on Bayless.

 

 

 

 

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Patriot Rover, Mandy.

May 2011: Patriot Rovers announced they would be honoring Amanda by naming one of their PTSD trained dogs after her. Chris Andrews, Amanda’s mother, named her Mandy. Mandy is now with Army SFC Mathew L. Nagel and wife Rhonda. they will be the forever friends of “Mandy” Patriot Rover. Update: SFC Nagel passed away and Mandy remains with his wife, Rhonda.

 

 

pinsonwall Honored by the NSA on Memorial Day 2006:
http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/memorial_wall/index.shtml (she was the first female intelligence soldier to ever be honored by the NSA; there are only 166 names on the wall to date: 12/2011) To read Amanda’s biography, written by the NSA, please click here: http://www.nsa.gov/about/_files/memorial_wall/pinson.pdf

 

2006 (Official Date Unknown): The United States Army honored Amanda by dedicating the building where she worked and naming it “Pinson Hall” (Tikrit, Iraq on FOB Speicher). As mentioned above, the plaque that was mounted on the building was given to her mother on December 7th, 2011 after FOB Speicher was shut down.

 

 

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Plaque at Fort Campbell, KY

November 2006: Fort Campbell held a ceremony honoring Amanda where she has her name on a stone by the flag on base.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Plaque at Hancock High School

June 3, 2006: A pink willow tree was planted, in her honor, at Hancock High School. Amanda graduated from Hancock High School in 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CD cover of “Angel in Fatigues”


March 2006: 
A song was written about her called, “Angel in Fatigues” (written by Blackie Starks) and played, for the first time at a tribute show, in her honor, on May 19, 2006. All money raised from the sale of “Angel in Fatigues” was donated to the SGT Amanda Pinson Memorial Scholarship.

 

 

 

 

SGT Amanda Pinson Memorial Scholarship Information:
To make a donation, please send by form of check or money order to be made to the: Hancock Alumni Association, Amanda Pinson Memorial Scholarship, ATTN: Sue Weber, 2191 Lemay Ferry Rd., St. Louis, MO, 63125. This scholarship will be given out to future graduates of Hancock Place High School. Christine Holmer was the first recipient in 2006.

 

Facebook Memorial Page:
Amanda’s Mother & I maintain a memorial page in Amanda’s honor at this location: https://www.facebook.com/SGTAmandaPinson

 Amanda’s Mother, Chris, has founded a 501(c)3 non-profit organization named the Missouri Military Memorial Foundation who will raise funds to erect a monument at Jefferson Barracks County Park honoring those who were either killed in action or a casualty of war during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, Desert Storm and Desert Shield. 
Posted in General, Military, SGT Amanda Pinson | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Henry F Frizzell

2f3b1f07-a8df-4466-a342-4691a9b1db58Henry F Frizzell married Rebecca St. Clair
Birth: Dec 1839 in Missouri, United States
Source:

Death: 25 May 1904 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, United States
Buried: See notes below
Source: Click here

Henry & Rebecca St. Clair were married in 1869 Madison Co., MO, USA
Source: (will get digital proof listed soon)

Spouse #1: Rebecca St. Clair
Birth 17 Jan 1849 in Madison, Missouri, United States
Death Jan 1888 in Madison, Missouri, United States

Henry & Sarah (nee Carmack) Bradshaw were married 11 Oct 1893 Madison Co., MO, USA
Source: Click here

Spouse #2: Sarah Bradshaw
Birth 5 Jun 1850 in Madison, Missouri, United States
Death 16 Feb 1924 in Fredericktown, Madison, Missouri, United States

MY HENRY F FRIZZELL CONNECTION

Children of Henry F Frizzell & Rebecca St. Clair: (my 4th Great Grandparents):
Margaret Mae “Maggie” Frizzell married John L. Sutton 6 Oct 1888 in Missouri
Birth Feb 1872 in Missouri, United States
Death 26 Nov 1934 in Iron, Iron, Missouri, United States

Children of Margaret May Frizzell and John L Sutton (my 3rd Great Grandparents):

Rachel D Sutton (married John Alexander Burnia 7 Feb 1910 in Fredericktown, Madison Co., Missouri)
Birth Jun 1894 in Spencer, Indiana, United States
Death 1967 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, United States

Children of Rachel D Sutton and John Alexander “Alex” Burnia (my 2nd Great Grandparents):

Alma May Burnia (married Bufford Lee Nickles, Sr. 23 Apr 1932 in Cadet, Washington Co., MO, USA (my Great Grandparents)
Birth 16 Feb 1916 in Missouri
Death 4 Feb 2011 in Bonne Terre, Saint Francois, Missouri, United States of America

Children of Alma May Burnia and Bufford Lee Nickles, Jr (my Great Grandparents):

Due to the fact that my Grandfather is still living I cannot post his name to further list the connection. From here I will respectively say that he is one of the 3 sons that Alma & Bufford, Sr. had. He is my maternal Grandfather (that meaning he is my Mother’s Father) and then there is me.

Note: To learn more about the Frizzell family lineage please see the page that I am working on as I further trace our family tree. Below you will find more information about Henry F. Frizzell posted. I hope that it assists you on discovering your roots. 

PICTURES & NOTES

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Front of Memorial

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Back of memorial

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Henry’s Great Great Great Great Great Granddaughter

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Memorial Bridge on Hwy 72W

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Headstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTICLES

AN UNKNOWN HERO TO BE HONORED MONDAY —
MADISON COUNTY PAYS TRIBUTE TO CIVIL WAR MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT – 
By SHERRY GREMINGER\Daily Journal Managing Editor
The DAILY JOURNAL, Friday, May 26, 2006
FREDERICKTOWN – For more than 100 years, a hero lay buried in St. Louis unknown to his family and unknown to his community. Although a stone at Mount Lebanon Cemetery on St. Charles Rock Road marks his grave site, noone is really sure the remains of Henry Frizzell are there.Monday, this man who died a pauper in St. Louis in 1904 will be honored here as Madison County’s only recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.Finally his family and community will have the opportunity to pay respects to this Union soldier who labored so hard to get his military record cleared and to eke out a meager life for himself and his family in the years following the Civil War.Frizzell’s great-great-grandson Charles Dalton, of St. Louis, and his two uncles Michael Sutton of St. Louis and David Sutton of Cuba, Mo. will be in Fredericktown Memorial Day to honor their ancestor. Dalton said his son might also be there – representing yet another generation who will finally be able to pay tribute to their family’s war hero.The Medford McClanahan American Legion Post 248 will hold a dedication ceremony at 11 a.m. Monday on the south lawn of the Madison County Courthouse to dedicate a monument to Frizzell, as the county’s only Medal of Honor recipient.Dalton said Frizzell died of consumption May 25, 1904 at City Hospital and because he was a pauper he was buried in Potter’s Field. His remains have since been moved twice and now supposedly rest in Mount Lebanon Cemetery on St. Charles Rock Road. When the city sold the ground at Potter’s Field
in 1957, all remains were moved to Mount Lebanon Cemetery.“When they sent the remains to the cemetery, there were no names or markers to accompany them. All of the remains were put in one section of the cemetery. That land was also later sold and the remains were moved to Section F in the cemetery,” Dalton said.According to Dalton a marker was dedicated to his ancestor in 1991. The ceremony was sponsored by the Medal of Honor Historical Society and the Veterans Administration provided a headstone etched in gold. Dalton said it was placed at the front of the cemetery because no one was exactly sure
where his remains might be.When Frizzell was buried, there is no indication any of his family was present. One thing, however, is certain – those burying him did not know Frizzell, the man, or Frizzell, the hero.HENRY FRIZZELL – THE MAN —
The attack on Fort Sumter in 1861 coupled with the promise of pay and food to eat were enough to entice a 21-year-old farmer from Fredericktown to join the Union Army. Henry Frizzell went to Pilot Knob on Aug. 6, 1861, and enlisted as a private in Company B, 6th Missouri Infantry.Henry was not a tall man, 5 feet, 6 inches. Through letters written for him, a picture emerges of a fair-haired, gray-eyed man who was born and raised on the Big St. Francois River. He was born into a poor family and his parents, Jason and Odeel (Smith) Frizzell could neither read nor write. Henry reports in letters written for him that there were no schools for him to attend, so he could not read or write himself.Henry tells of being wounded several times. He was captured twice by Confederates and worked for many years following the end of the Civil War to have desertion charges expunged from his record.According to historical accounts from the time of Henry’s enlistment, the 6th Missouri Infantry was in the thick of many battles and traveled from Springfield, Mo. in October of 1861 to Vicksburg, Miss., in 1863 where they joined the assault on the last Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River. It was for his actions during this assault that the Medal of Honor was bestowed upon him.He was shot in the right side of his head just below his right eye as he made an assault on Fort Hill. He was captured by the Confederates and spent one week in their hospital. He was then paroled and sent to the Jeffersonville, Ohio hospital, where he spent two months.FORLORN HOPE: VOLUNTEER STORMERS —
Frizzell was a member of a group nicknamed “Forlorn Hope: Volunteer Stormers.”A book “Deeds of Valor: How America’s Civil War Heroes Won the Congressional Medal of Honor” published in 1903 recounts in detail the deeds of the Volunteer Storming Party of Vicksburg.According to the book, this group, made up entirely of volunteers, led the general assault on Vicksburg on May 22, 1863. The assault was thought to be so dangerous that Union Commander Gen. Ulysses S. Grant would not allow married men to volunteer.Grant had underestimated the strength of the Confederates and although he had the city circled on three sides with a 12-mile battle line and warships stationed on the Mississippi, things were not going well for the Union general.Wanting to avoid a lengthy siege, Grant decided to storm the city. The Confederates had dug in along the top of a bluff and Grant chose a portion of that bluff which was to the south of Fort Hill. This fort in addition to being almost perpendicular, was protected by a ditch about 12 feet wide and 5 or 6 feet deep and sloping up toward the enemy’s guns.It was estimated the storming party needed at least 150 men. Twice that number answered the call, with those volunteering first being accepted.The battle plan was formulated. The men were to build a bridge over the ditch and plant scaling ladders against the embankment. By the time they had accomplished this feat, it was expected the supporting brigades would be ready to make the final assault.THE ASSAULT —
On the morning of May 22, 1863, the storming party gathered in a ravine out of sight of the Confederates. Here they had a pile of logs, lumber and scaling ladders. The advance party’s job was for two men to carry the logs, run toward the trench and throw them across the ditch to form the
basis of a bridge. The second group was to follow closely with the lumber to throw across the logs. The third group was to bring the ladders, run across the bridge and place them against the fort.From minute one, things did not work out well for the “forlorn hope.” Enemy fire was so heavy that as they advanced at a dead run, about half of them were shot down and the area was thick with smoke.When the survivors did arrive at the ditch, they could not make a bridge because so many logs and pieces of lumber had been dropped. They also discovered they could not stay where they were because of heavy enemy fire.Historical accounts relate the survivors jumped into the ditch and Private Howell G. Trogden who carried the storming party’s flag planted it on the parapet of the fort. Trogden kept firing at the enemy when they tried toreach the flag.

Other brigades advanced to support the small group of men, but only 30 men, those of the 11th Missouri reached them. They planted their flag and dug in wherever they could find shelter. It was reported the bottom of the ditch was filled with mangled bodies with heads and limbs blown off.

The assault had plainly failed, but the men in the ditch could neither retreat nor advance. They held their position until, under the cover of darkness, they were able to leave. Of the storming party, 85 percent were killed and there were only a few who escaped without a wound of some kind.

In the fighting that followed, the Union suffered more than 3,000 casualties and 97 Union soldiers earned Medals of Honor (the second largest single-day total in history).

The following Missouri men who survived the siege of Vicksburg were recognized by their country with the Medal of Honor: John Ayers, 8th Missouri Infantry; Matthew Bickford, 8th Missouri Infantry; James
Cunningham, 8th Missouri Infantry; James Flynn, 6th Missouri Infantry; Henry Frizzell (Frazell), 6th Missouri Infantry; Louis Hunt, 6th Missouri Infantry; David Johnston, 8th Missouri Infantry; George Stockman, 6th Missouri Infantry; Howell Trogden, 8th Missouri Infantry; John Wagner, 8th Missouri Infantry; Joseph Wortick, 8th Missouri Infantry.

DESERTION CHARGES FILED —
A letter written by a friend in Fredericktown found in his Medal of Honor file reported Frizzell believed his regiment was in Alabama when he rejoined it after being released from the hospital following the siege of Vicksburg. He does report in letters that he fought at the battle of Chattanooga, Tenn. on Lookout Mountain.

With his regiment now under the command of General William Sherman, he continued in the March to Atlanta and was shot in the left leg above the knee at the battle of Resaca Georgia and went to the hospital. He rejoined his unit and remained with it though Georgia and Carolina until March of
1864.

On March 1, 1864, at Lynchcreek, North Carolina, Frizzell ended his war years. He went with a friend to a house to rest and was captured by enemy forces. He escaped from the Confederates and thinking the war was over, began his long trek home. This move resulted in desertion charges being
brought against him.

In letters written for him to help get the charge removed from his military record, he tells of being tired, confused and captured.

In a letter written Feb. 18, 1891, Frizzell tells how Andy Harness, who was in the same regiment with him persuaded him to go to a private home where they could get some rest. He said Harness convinced him that the “Rebels were whipped and the war would soon be over.”

While they were resting at the home, they were captured by Confederates. They did escape, but their regiment had moved north and with Confederates everywhere, Frizzell is quoted as saying, “It was impossible to rejoin the unit.”

It is reported that everywhere they went they kept hearing that the war was over, so he just started working his way back to Madison County.

Another letter states, “My head hurt and my left leg, which had been wounded, gave out.”

The author of the letter wrote that Frizzell said he only went to the home with Harness because he was not well and was completely worn out. The writer said Frizzell told him that since being wounded at Vicksburg, his memory had been bad and he “cannot recall important things to family and myself. I am satisfied that at times I am not in my right mind. I was laboring under this state of mind when I left my command.”

Several more letters, most written in February of 1891, attested to Frizzell’s good character, but alluded to mental problems probably caused by his injures suffered at Vicksburg.

One letter written by Jonathan Williams said, “After the war he has been of weak mind, almost like an idiot and hardly of a mind to care for himself. He is very poor and destitute and the only support is from what little labor he can do.”

Yet another letter, written by Fielding King who enlisted in the 6th Regiment with Frizzell said, “Henry was shot on the side of the head cutting his ear and corner of the right eye at Vicksburg. When he rejoined the regiment, he never appeared to be entirely himself. He never would have left, with Andrew Harness, on his own accord. He was a good soldier, he never shirked his duty nor tried to keep out of battle. He returned to Madison County in September of 1865.”

Thomas Hollday (sic) stated that he had know Frizzell since childhood and aided him as he could. He said he paid for all the cost for postage and affidavits because “he is very poor, illiterate and ignorant. His mind is weak and memory bad but he is a good citizen.”

AN HONORED VETERAN —
All these letters must have helped because in a letter dated March 31,1891, the War Department removed the charge of desertion from his record.


The last letter in Frizzell’s Medal of Honor file is one dated June 30,1894 which says that he had been awarded a Medal of Honor medal which would be forwarded by mail.

This letter stated, “I have the honor to inform you that… By direction of the President, and without solicitation from any source – the award being based solely upon the official records – let a Medal of Honor be presented to Private Henry F. Frizzell, Co. B, 6th Missouri Infantry, for most distinguished gallantry in action at Vicksburg, Miss., May 22, 1863.

“The soldier was a member of a volunteer storming party which made a most gallant assault upon the enemy’s works. Signed: Joseph B. Doe, Asst. Secretary of War.”

None of his living descendants know what happened to that medal, nor how Frizzell ended his life destitute in St. Louis.

But on Memorial Day, none of that will matter. A hero will be honored and members of his family and community will be witness to the ceremony.

The DAILY JOURNAL, Friday, May 26, 2006

The Vicksburg campaign was waged from March 29 to July 4, 1863. It included battles in west-central Mississippi at Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill, Big Black River and numerous smaller battle fields. On the morning of May 22, General Grant launched what he hoped would be a crushing assault against Vicksburg. In the fighting that followed, the Union Infantry was repulsed and thrown back along a three-mile front. The Union Army suffered more than 3,000 casualties, and 97 Union soldiers earned Medals of Honor (the second largest single-day total in history.) Private Henry Frizzell was one of eighty soldiers cited simply for “Gallantry in the charge of the ‘volunteer storming party,’ seemingly innocuous wording that actually denotes the fact that Private Frizzell was at the head of his attacking force where the enemy fire was hottest and the danger the greatest. Following the failed assault on May 22, a forty-seven day siege was laid against the city, which finally surrendered to Union forces on July 4.

6. HENRY F3 FRIZZELL (JASON2 , THOMAS1 ) was born Dec 1837 in Area of Silver Mines on Big St Francois River,Madison County Missouri, and died 25 May 1904 in Temporary City Hospital, St Louis, Missouri. He married (1) REBECCA SINCLAIR 1869 in Madison Co. Missouri30, daughter of WILLIAM ST. CLAIR and WILEY JOHNSON. She was born 17 Jan 1849 in Madison County Missouri31, and died Abt. 1889 in Madison County Missouri. He married (2) SARAH ELLEN CARMACK 11 Oct 1893 in Madison Co. Missouri32. She was born 05 Jun 1850 in Madison County Missouri, and died 16 Feb 1924 in Fredericktown, Madison Co. Missouri33. Notes for HENRY F FRIZZELL: Henry was buried in St Louis City’s Potter’s Field in 1904. It was located at Sublette & Fyler which is now the site of the Hampton Gardens Apartments. In 1957 Potter’s Field was moved to Mount Lebanon Cemetery at 11101 St Charles Rock Road. There were no records or markers with the remains received from the City. They were buried at about Cypress and Hunter Drive. In 1995 when the cemetery sold this land, all remains were moved to a a mass grave in Section F graves 450 & 452 in same cemetery. The area sold is now the parking lot for Hunter Engineering. On May 26 1991 a marker was placed in Section N by the Medal of Honor Historical Society to honor Henry as a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient. Sonny Wells of the Medal of Honor Historical Society did the research on Henry and gave the information to the Veterans Adminstration which provided the head stone etched in gold. Sonny also arranged the ceremony and Geraldine Sanders Smith gave a speech about Henry. Being that the exact location of his remains were unknown, the Marker was placed in the front of the Cemetery. Henry was shot in the Battle of Vicksburg Mississippi on the outside of his right eye breaking bone, causing vision problems and removing part of right ear. Battle was on May 22, 1863.He was wounded again in the Battle of Resaca Georgia during May 14, 1864. His wound was a gunshot 2 inches above his left knee. Letter to: Henry F. Frizzell, Fredericktown, Mo. dated July 30, 1894I have the honor to inform you that by the direction of the President, and without solicitation from any source – the award being based solely upon the official records – let a Medal of Honor be presented to Private Henry F. Frizzell, Co. B 6th Missouri Infantry, for most distinguished gallantry in action at Vicksburg, Miss., May 22, 1863. Thi s soldier was a member of a volunteer storming party which made a most gallant assault upon the enemy’s works. signed Joseph B. Doe, Asst. Secretary of War Pvt. Henry Frizzell is the only person from Madison Co. Mo. to be awarded this esteemed medal, sometimes now called Congressional Medal of Honor. There have been only 3,461 medals awarded from 1862 to 2006, of which 77 were given to people from Missouri.He received the medal through the mail and signed for it at the post office, in Fredericktown, on 2 Aug. 1894. When the Cyclone of 1896 destroyed the city hospital on Lafayette Avenue the patients were transferred to Emergency Hospital 1. This was the Convent of the House of Good Shepherd located on the block bounded by 17th, 18th, Pine and Chestnut Streets. By 1901 the hospital became so overcrowded the city purchased the Pius Hospital at 14th and O’Fallon to be Emergency Hospital 2. Number 2 hospital was used for patients with Communicable Diseases. Both was used until August 10, 1905 when the new hospital on Lafayette Avenue was completed. Because Henry died of Consumption, also called TB, I do not know which hospital he may have died in. On May 29, 2006 the American Legion Post 248 dedicated a monument, on the south lawn of the Fredericktown Courthouse, in honor of Henry Frizzell. They raised the money for the monument from people and businesses around Fredericktown. Speeches were given by Kent Kooi, from the Medal of Honor Historical Society, and Charles Dalton on behalf of Henry’s descendants. 10 descendants representing 4 generations were present. Mayor Karen Yates welcomed evereyone and Donnie Owens who started the idea was master of ceremony. Geraldine Sanders Smith, who spoke at 1991 ceremony was present but did not speak. More About HENRY F FRIZZELL: Burial: 1957, Mount Lebanon Cemetery, St Louis MissouriBurial permit Issued: 29 May 1904, City of St Louis Mo.34 More About HENRY FRIZZELL and REBECCA SINCLAIR: Marriage: 1869, Madison Co. Missouri35 Notes for SARAH ELLEN CARMACK: After her 2nd husband died in 1890 she started writing for his pension. She never received his pension because she never proved that she divorced her 1st Husband.The War Department sent several letters explaining that the needed proof that she divorced her 1st husband before she married William Bradshaw. They said she was not the legal wife of Bradshaw. After Henry, her 3rd husband, died she started writing for his pension which she never got because she married him after the Act of 1890 was passed. Several times they sent hers letters that she was not entitled to his pension and why. She first started writing letters herself then got 3 lawyers and finally one person from Fredericktown to also write and try to get either pension. I think she went to each person and after they got the answer that she was not entitled and told her so, she went and found someone else. Her last attempt was in 1918 and I guess it finally sunk in or she could not find anybody else to try. In 1881 in Madison Co. Mo. there is a divorce of a Nathaniel Martin and Sarah Martin. Sarah’s 1st husband was Nathaniel Martin who she stayed with only 3 days after marriage in June 1880.

TIMELINE:

When Henry F. Frizzell was born in December 1839 in Missouri, his father, Jason, was 24 and his mother, Odeel, was 26. He married Rebecca Sinclair and they had two sons and two daughters together between 1872 and 1883. He then married Sarah Ellen Carmack on October 11, 1893, in Madison County, Missouri. He died on May 25, 1904, in St Louis, Missouri, at the age of 64, and was buried in St Ann, Missouri.

December 1839: Henry F Frizzell was born in Missouri.

1850: Henry F. Frizzell lived in Madison County, Missouri at age 11

1860: Henry F. Frizzell lived in Polk, Missouri, at age 21. His father Jason passed away in Madison County, Missouri, at the age of 45. Henry lived in Missouri during 1860, around the time when pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces clashed along the Kansas-Missouri border. In November, President Lincoln was elected.

April 12, 1861: Civil War Begins

July 19, 1861: The 6th Missouri Infantry was ordered to Pilot Knob, Missouri and on duty there until September.

August 6, 1861: Henry traveled to Camp Blood in Pilot Knob, Missouri and enlisted for 3 years in the 6th Missouri Infantry, Company B at the age of 21.

On August 29, 1861: at Moore’s Mills

August 30, 1861: General John C Fremont, without notifying President Lincoln, issued a controversial proclamation putting Missouri under Martial Law.

September/October 1861 Muster Roll: Two months into his service with the Missouri Infantry he contracted the Measles, Bronchitis and sore eyes and was sent to a hospital in Tipton, Missouri.
– In October and November Fremont’s campaign against Springfield, Missouri took place.

November/December 1861: present on Muster Roll
– in Tipton, MO & Lamine, MO; guarded Pacific Railroad from Syracuse to Jefferson City, MO

January/February 1862: present on Muster Roll

March/April 1862: present on Muster Roll
– Sink Pole Woods on April 20, 1862. Moved to Pittsburg Landing in late April)

May/June 1862: present on Muster Roll
– Advance on and siege of Corinth, Mississippi between April 29 and May 30, 1862
– Coldwater, Mississippi on May 11, 1862
– March to Memphis, Tennessee via Lagrange, Holly Springs and Moscow June 3 – July 21, 1862

July/August 1862:
present on Muster Roll
– On duty in Memphis, Tennessee until November
September/October 1862: present on Muster Roll
– Expedition to Coldwater and Hernando, Mississippi from September 9-13, 1862
– On duty in Memphis, Tennessee until November

November/December 1862:
present on Muster Roll
– On duty in Memphis, Tennessee until November
–  Grant’s Central Mississippi Campaign (November – December)
– “Tallahatchie March” November 26 – December 12, 1862
– Sherman’s Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862 – January 3, 1863
– Chickasaw Bayou December 26 – 28
– Chickasaw Bluff December 29

January/February 1863: present on Muster Roll
– Expedition to Arkansas Post, Arkansas – January 3  – 10th
– Assault and capture of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post – January 10 – 11th
– Moved to Young’s Point, Louisiana January 13 – 22; on duty there until March.

March/April 1863: present on Muster Roll
– Expedition to Rolling Fork via Muddy Steele’s and Black Bayous and Deer Creek March 4 – 27th
– Demonstration on Haines and Drumgould’s Bluffs April 29 – May 2

April 10, 1863: present on Muster Roll

May/June 1863: marked absent and wounded (read: Battle of Vicksburg below)
– Haines Bluff on May 1
– Moved to join army in rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi via Richmond and Grand Gulf May 2  – 16
– Battle of Champion Hill May 16
– Siege of Vicksburg May 18 – July 4
– Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22
– Absent & wounded at Battle of Vicksburg May 22, 1863. Henry was taken to a hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

May 22, 1863: Battle of Vicksburg in Mississippi (under Ulysses S Grant with the Army of the Tennessee). While there Henry joined a fighting group of only unmarried volunteers. This group, called Forlorn Hope, was so named because they were not expected to return. This unit was to storm “Fort Hill” as Henry described it. This “fort” was actually a patchwork of several well-protected forts and entrenchment’s, which housed a Confederate garrison of more than 20,000 men.

On May 22, 1863, the brave men of Forlorn Hope attacked Fort Hill. At the end of the battle 85% of this volunteer storming party were either killed or badly wounded. Henry was one of the wounded that day, suffering a gunshot to the head, breaking the bone by his right eye and losing a portion of his right ear. For his actions on that date he would later be received the Medal of Honor. To this day, he is the only Medal of Honor recipient from Madison County and one of only 77 from Missouri.

Henry was captured by the confederacy that day. A week later he was released by the confederacy in prisoner exchange and spent the next two months in a hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

June 1, 1863: Paroled as Prisoner of War

July/August 1863: Absent & wounded. Henry at General Hospital in Memphis, TN.

July 31, 1863: present at Benton Barracks in Missouri.
(Note: Benton Barracks was located at the site of present day Fairground Park at the corner of Grand Blvd and Natural Bridge Blvd.)

August 18, 1863: present on Muster Roll

August 31, 1863: at Benton Barracks in Missouri

June 17, 1863: present on Muster Roll

September/October 1863: present on Muster Roll
– 6th MO Infantry at Big Black until September 25
– Moved to Memphis, Tennessee, then marched to Chattanooga, TN September 25 – November 21
– Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 20 – 29
– Bear Creek, Tuscumbia October 27

November/December 1863:
present on Muster Roll
– Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23 – 27
– Brown’s Ferry November 23
– Foot of Missionary Ridge November 24
– Tunnel Hill, Missionary Ridge November 24 – 25
– Pursuit to Graysville November 26 – 27
– March to relief of Knoxville, Tennessee November 28 – December 5
– Expedition to Tellico Plains December 6 – 13
– March to Chattanooga, Tennessee December 13 – 17; then to Bridgeport, Alabama December 19

January/February 1864: Discharged in order to reenlist
– Garrison duty in Alabama until May 1864; present on Muster Roll

January 3, 1864: Discharged

January 4, 1864: Reenlisted in Bellefonte, Alabama for 3 years w/6th Missouri Infantry

February 7, 1864: Mustered in after reenlistment in Larkinsville, Alabama

March/April 1864: present on Muster Roll

March 3, 1864: Pilot Knob

May/June 1864: present on Muster Roll
– Atlanta Campaign May 1 – September 8
– Demonstrations on Resaca May 8 – 13
– Battle of Resaca – May 14 – 15th: Henry and the 6th Missouri infantry joined General Sherman on his march through Georgia. Henry was shot in the left knee on May 14, 1864

May 31, 1864: at Jefferson Hospital in Jefferson, Indiana

June 1864: Returned to service
– Operations about Marietta and against Kennesaw Mountain June 10 – July 2
– Bushy Mountain June 15 – 17
– Assault on Kennesaw June 27

July/August 1864:
present on Muster Roll
– Nickajack Creek July 2 – 5
– Chattahoochee River July 6 – 17
– Battle of Atlanta July 22
– Siege of Atlanta July 22 – August 25
– Ezra Chapel July 28 Hood’s 2nd sortie
– Flank movement on Jonesboro August 31 – September 1

September/October 1864: present on Muster Roll
– Lovejoy’s Station September  2 – 6
– Operations in northern Georgia and northern Alabama against Hood September 29 – November 3

November/December 1864: present on Muster Roll
– March to the sea November 15 – December 10
– Near Clinton November 21 – 25
– Statesboro December 3
– Siege of Savannah December 10 – 21
– Fort McAllister December 13

January/February 1865: present on Muster Roll
– Campaign of the Carolinas January – April
– Duck Branch, near Loper’s Cross Roads, South Carolina February 2
– Salkehatchie Swamps February 3 – 5
– South Edisto River February 9
– North Edisto River February 12 – 13
– Columbia February 16 – 17

January 11, 1865: Missouri Ordinance of Emancipation goes into effect. Slavery is dead in Missouri.

March/April 1865: Marked as deserted on Muster Roll. March 1, 1865
– Fought at Lynch Creek, North Carolina, where the Confederates captured him again.

March 31, 1865: marked as deserted on Muster Roll (see above)

April 9, 1865: General Lee surrenders.

April 14, 1865: President Lincoln was assassinated.

May 12-15, 1865: Civil War ends.

August 17, 1865: 6th Mo Infantry mustered out.  After escaping, Henry heard the war was over and, in his own words, “he started working his way back to Madison County as best he could.”

September 1865: Henry made it back to Madison County, eventually getting married to Rebecca Sinclair and having children.

1869:
marries Rebecca Sinclair

February 1872: Henry’s daughter Margaret Mae was born in Missouri.

February 2, 1873: His father-in-law, William Ashley St. Clair/Sinclair dies.
Hordes of grasshoppers descended on the Midwest.

1876: Shows up on 1876 census record for Township 33, Madison County, Missouri with wife Rebecca (Sinclair) Frizzell and his son William was born this same year.

1880: Henry’s daughter Mattie was born in Missouri.

1883: Henry’s son George was born.

January 1888: Rebecca (Sinclair) Frizzell dies.

October 6, 1888: Henry’s daughter, Margaret marries John L Sutton.

March 3, 1891: Desertion charges removed.

October 11, 1893: Marries Sarah Ellen Carmack. She was previously married to (1) Nathaniel Martin (2) William C Bradshaw

June 1894: His granddaughter (Margaret Mae’s daughter; my Great Great Grandmother) was born in Spencer County, Indiana.

July 30, 1894: Awarded Medal of Honor.

 “I have the honor to inform you that… By direction of the President, and without solicitation from any source – the award being based solely upon the official records – let a Medal of Honor be presented to Private Henry F. Frizzell, Co. B, 6th Missouri Infantry, for most distinguished gallantry in action at Vicksburg, Miss., May 22, 1863.

“The soldier was a member of a volunteer storming party which made a most gallant assault upon the enemy’s works. Signed: Joseph B. Doe, Asst. Secretary of War.”

August 2, 1894: Henry received the Medal of Honor through the mail and signed for it at the Fredericktown post office.

July 5, 1902: his daughter Mattie marries Henry Patrick Stone in Indiana.

December 14, 1902: his son William marries Anna Stevenson in Madison County, MO

May 25, 1904: at the age of 67. He is buried in Mount Lebanon Cemetery Saint Ann, Missouri. Frizzell’s marker is located near the front entrance of the cemetery. He was originally buried at Potter’s Field in St. Louis City at the corner of Sublette & Fyler. Remains were removed to Mount Lebanon Cemetery in 1957 with no identification. In 1995 his remains were moved again.

November 26, 1934: His daughter Margaret (Frizzell) Sutton dies. Buried at Mine La Motte, MO

19 July 1959: Kansas City Star writes article, “Hunts Kin of Heroes” mentioning that the District of Columbia Civil War Centennial Commission was searching for ancestors of Henry F Frizzell.

May 26, 1991: a marker was placed at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Section N by the Medal of Honor Historical Society to honor Henry as a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient.

May 26, 2006: Memorial at Madison County Courthouse, Madison County, Missouri

April 9, 2010:  the Missouri Department of Transportation held a Bridge Dedication Ceremony to rename a bridge on Route 72 over the St. Francois River in Madison County in honor of Frizzell, who lived nearby in the Roselle Community.

 

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